Musings on Gender, Archaeology, and Pilgrimage in the Late Antique Near East

The monastery of Aaron at Jabal Harun, Jordan (c) Marlena Whiting

Marlena Whiting (University of Amsterdam)

What can a gendered reading (based in feminist critique) of the archaeological evidence for pilgrimage in the Late Antique Near East reveal about women and pilgrimage?

Continuer la lecture de « Musings on Gender, Archaeology, and Pilgrimage in the Late Antique Near East »

Accommodating Female Pilgrims in the Late Antique Holy Land

Marlena Whiting (University of Amsterdam)

From as early as the fourth or fifth centuries AD, we can name as many as a dozen women who undertook pilgrimage to the holy sites of Palestine and Egypt – and can make note of the dozens more nameless ones who are mentioned in the saints’ lives of the times. It is far from surprising that pilgrimage became a popular form of religious expression for Christian women – journeying in search of a cure or divine intervention had been popular among women for centuries, as the fourth century BC cure lists from Epidauros in Greece demonstrate. However, it becomes clear from some objections registered by prominent Church leaders, that the religiously charged environment in which pilgrimage took place did present pious women with obstacles in their quest for their objective. These obstacles presented themselves both on the journey itself and at the destination, and were especially concerned with issues of accommodation.

Continuer la lecture de « Accommodating Female Pilgrims in the Late Antique Holy Land »

Les femmes et le vin dans la Rome antique. Bilan documentaire et historiographique

Marie-Adeline Le Guennec (École française de Rome)

Scène de banquet, Herculanum (c. 50 av. J.-C.) (c) domaine public
Scène de banquet, Herculanum (c. 50 av. J.-C.) (c) domaine public

Le régime agricole et alimentaire traditionnel de Rome, de l’Italie et de son empire apparaît dominé par ce que l’on nomme la « triade méditerranéenne », qui se compose des céréales, de la vigne, dont on tire le vin et de l’olivier, destiné à produire de l’huile. On a toutefois longtemps considéré que le vin n’aurait pas été connu en Italie centrale avant le IVe s. av. J.-C., au prix d’une lecture hypercritique des sources littéraires, il est vrai plus tardives, qui évoquaient la consommation du vin pendant les premiers siècles de Rome. En réalité, depuis les années 1980, à la lumière notamment des découvertes archéologiques, ce postulat historiographique a été battu en brèche par historiens et archéologues (voir par exemple Gras 1983 ; Brun 2004  ; Tchernia 2016) et il apparaît à présent établi que le vin était connu, importé voire produit en Italie centrale dès l’époque archaïque, chez les Étrusques mais également à Rome, même si l’accélération de la production viticole romaine est incontestablement plus tardive (Ve-IIIe s. av. J.-C.).

Continuer la lecture de « Les femmes et le vin dans la Rome antique. Bilan documentaire et historiographique »

The Monastic Paradox: negotiating monastic seclusion and pilgrim hospitality in the Late Antique Near East

Marlena Whiting (University of Amsterdam)

Mosaic from the Church of the Multiplication of the Loaves and Fishes at Tabgha (Heptapegon) in the Galilee (c) Elias Khamis/Manar al-Athar
Mosaic from the Church of the Multiplication of the Loaves and Fishes at Tabgha (Heptapegon) in the Galilee (c) Elias Khamis/Manar al-Athar

There is a paradox within the monastic ideal: on the one hand, monks are meant to withdraw from the world into spiritual and ascetic seclusion; on the other hand, scripture enjoins hospitality on all Christians, to emulate the model of Abraham at Mamre – “for in this way some have entertained angels unawares” (Hebrews 13:2). This paradox becomes especially pronounced in the course of the fourth and fifth centuries AD, as monastic communities become custodians of the increasingly popular pilgrim shrines in the Holy Land and elsewhere in the Near East. Some practitioners took this paradox to extremes, such as the stylite saints, who maintained a highly visible seclusion while at the same dispensing advice and blessings to large numbers of visitors. Historical texts, such as saints’ lives or pilgrim accounts, describe the tensions that arise from the paradox. Below I explore the scriptural and pious models for hospitality and charity, and the resulting conflict between monastic seclusion and pilgrim hospitality as described in the sources. I will also look at issues such as different levels of access to public and private space, differentiation between monastic and lay guests, and differentiation by gender.

Continuer la lecture de « The Monastic Paradox: negotiating monastic seclusion and pilgrim hospitality in the Late Antique Near East »